Control-Z Culture: Helping or Harming Your Team?

Control-Z Culture: Helping or Harming Your Team?

Maybe you remember the typewriter days. It used to be a typing mistake meant ripping out a whole sheet of paper and starting over. Then correction fluid was invented, which progressed to a correction tape right in the typewriter. Today, pressing Control-Z is a quick way to "undo" and eliminate almost any mistake we might make on our computer...

A recent conversation has me wondering if a culture of Control-Z could be diminishing people's contingency thinking...

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Empower yourself and your team by saying thank you

Empower yourself and your team by saying thank you

We help teams build vulnerability-based trust as the basis of becoming a high performing team. A key element to creating this type of trust is admitting when you make a mistake.

There are several potential ways to admit a mistake, and each has different implications for your team:

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To risk and be resilient - this is our calling.

To risk and be resilient - this is our calling.

I've been soaking up lots of good ideas lately - reading Decisive by the Heath Brothers, To Sell is Human by Dan Pink, The Icarus Deception by Seth Godin, and working with some great clients from Colorado to Washington DC. And I've been being pretty lazy. Oh, I don't mean doing-nothing lazy. There are many days when I barely remember closing my eyes at night. I mean...

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Employees Will Rise to the Occasion

Employees Will Rise to the Occasion
We all know the correlation of actively engaged employees to productivity, safety and overall profit. The key to organizations surviving these tough times lies in your employees. It is your employees that will add that extra value to your products/services and will keep your customers coming back now and when the recession is over. Your employees are the key to your organization’s survival.
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Turning crisis into opportunity

I think there are some people who believe that having a positive outlook right now is either:

  1. Crazy
  2. Stupid
  3. Completely unrealistic
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I continue to have a positive outlook. For the record, that doesn't mean I believe that things are going to turn around tomorrow and the world will be handed to me on a silver platter.

My positive outlook is that I can continue to influence my future by taking action in the present. Today. Now.

Here's a short article on Jim Collins, of Built to Last and Good to Great fame: http://money.cnn.com/2009/01/15/news/companies/Jim_Collins_Crisis.fortune/index.htm

Are you waiting on the mountain, or making a decision to either go for the summit or retreat to climb again later?

It's up to you.

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Chris Hutchinson, CEO

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Chris Hutchinson

As CEO of Trebuchet Group, Chris Hutchinson thrives working with clients and his team to improve organizational clarity, teamwork, and leadership impact.

After years of building Legos® and tree houses around the world, Chris earned his Mechanical Engineering degree and followed that with an MBA. His experiences in the military and the business world taught him great leadership can be learned, and everyone is in some way a leader.

Clients and peers describe him as an inspirational catalyst for positive change. He is the author of Ripple - A Field Manual for Leadership That Works.

Chris and his wife live, garden, and bike in Fort Collins, Colorado, and have four children. He has an unrequited love affair with brownies.

Fear is not a success strategy

Fear is not a success strategy
In my work, I have visited more organizations than I care to think about that have fired people who have become paralyzed by earnestly listening to the boss: “Don’t do this. Never do that. Under no circumstances do anything like that again!” Eventually these people, driven by fear of doing what the boss didn’t want, were reduced to doing the fewest “wrong” things possible — which was essentially nothing. Once they weren’t contributing in any useful way, their firing was easily justified.
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